Marathon Blog

Meet the Naperville Kids Marathon Race Director

 

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Meet David Cleveland, Race Director for the 2016 Naperville Kids Marathon!

Cleveland has been involved with the Naperville Marathon & Half Marathon since its start three years ago as an Aid Station Manager. With his background in running and career working with children, it was without a doubt that he was the right person to spearhead the Naperville Kids Marathon.

“I started running when I was 35 years old. When I ran my first marathon and came in last place, I caught a fever for it,” said Cleveland. “The running community is all wonderful and positive people.”

Since that first marathon, Cleveland has competed in over 30 marathons, including four trips to Boston, and has even run internationally in London, Berlin, Rome, and Hamberg. He also participates in track workouts with Vic Hildebrand at North Central College and has been a dedicated runner with Mark Witt’s running club on Saturday morning’s for the last 14 years.

When he is not organizing the Naperville Kids Marathon, Cleveland, a retired school teacher of 36 years, has returned back to Elmwood Elementary School to take charge of the school’s running club, a position he has held for the last six years alongside Kathy Mueller.

“Having the children do the marathon gives them an example of what comes with perseverance to complete a life goal,” Cleveland said about the impact the Naperville Kids Marathon has on participants. “Today, kids spend too much time looking at screens and not moving. Running is an inexpensive sport that rewards the participant with countless health benefits such as a stronger heart and weight control.”

The Naperville Kids Marathon is a fun experience for children ages 5-13 to not only develop a love for physical fitness and activity, but also running. Children, with adult supervision, run or walk one mile 25 times over the summer and fall and record each run/walk in their colorful running log!

The program’s final 1.2 miles are completed with other hundreds of children who have been running their miles all summer on October 22, 2016. On race day, participants receive their official race t-shirt and bib before toeing the start line at the Naperville North High School football stadium. Runners are also welcome to have a parent or guardian run alongside them. When the children cross the finish line, they will receive their finisher’s medal, just like the finishers in the adult race.

“The main goals for the event are not only safety, fun, and excitement for running, but also developing a lifelong activity,” said Cleveland. “My daughters started off running 5K races and now I have done marathons with them and it’s the highlight of my life. It’s a wonderful feeling to run a marathon with your children.”

Registration is only $12, including the tee shirt, race bib, and finisher medal. Over 500 children have claimed their spots for the big event and registration will remain open until the end of the summer or once 1,000 entries have been received. For more information and registration, visit: http://runnaperville.com/kids-marathon/

 

Article written by Emily Zadny, 2016 Naperville Marathon & Half Marathon Media Coordinator

Which should I run? Half Marathon vs. Marathon

Marathon vs. Half Marathon

We’ve written a lot about marathon preparation and training, but I’m sure many readers aren’t interested in training for and running the marathon at this point in life. For those of you not planning for 26.2 this year, there are many benefits of running and training for the half marathon.

Physiology: One of the most important differences between the marathon and the half marathon is that the human body cannot store enough glycogen (the body’s favorite go-to energy source) to finish a marathon. The good news is the human body has plenty of glycogen to finish a half marathon. This means, for the half marathon, you won’t need to do all of the super-long training runs designed to teach your body to burn fat as a fuel for exercise. As a result, you’ll also find the half marathon long runs don’t take as much out of you and are easier to recover from than marathon long runs.

Time (per week): Given the distance difference between the half marathon and marathon, you’ll need to devote much less time to half marathon training. Your longest training run for the half marathon will likely be 12 miles or two hours. This is much less time-consuming than building up to a 20- or 21-mile training run as is necessary for the marathon.

Time (per year): Depending on your starting running fitness level, it will take much less calendar time to train for a half marathon as compared to the marathon. As an example, if you’re currently running 8-10 miles per week and have been doing so for two or more months, it will take you about 12 weeks to train for a half marathon. From this same starting point, it will likely take you about 24 weeks to prepare for the marathon.

Physical demands: The long runs and mileage demands of marathon training, along with the calendar time necessary to prepare for the marathon, take a toll on a runner. A runner training for the marathon needs to pay close attention to diet/nutrition, rest/sleep and stress levels in order to stay healthy through the marathon training process. The half marathon places much less demand on the body. Of course, it still makes sense to take good care of your body during half marathon training, but there is a lot more wiggle room. Added post-race bonus: You’ll recover more quickly from a half marathon and have less risk of injury due to less wear and tear on the body.

Psychological demands: Due to the difficulties of marathon training, there are a lot of psychological demands on the runner. The training can create a lot of stress and consume so much time and energy that it interferes with other aspects of your life. If you have a lot going on in your life, you may have trouble finding the time for marathon training. Half marathon training creates much less mental stress for you and your family.

Marathon transition: If you are a relatively new runner, you may eventually want to run a marathon. The half marathon is a great stepping stone and an excellent way to prepare your body for the rigors of marathon training. If you are a new runner, consider running the half marathon this year and the marathon next year!

Next: Training for the half marathon

Img_Fitness_7B_LaurieLasseterLaurie Lasseter
Marathoner
ACE Certified Personal Trainer
RRCA Certified Running Coach
Edward-Elmhurst Health & Fitness Centers
www.EEHealth.org/fitness

 

8 Benefits of Keeping a Training Log

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A training log should be an essential part of every runner’s routine. The days go by, the miles go by, the years go by. But how do we remember what we did from day to day and from year to year? How did that interval run feel last week or last month? The only way to know, unless you have a memory like an elephant, is to keep a training log. It is essential for many reasons.

 

  1. Training logs allow us to develop a plan and stick to it. Logs allow us to map our training plan and carry it through, and they’re an excellent reference – to check what’s ahead in future workouts or review our training history.

 

  1. Logs allow for self-reflection. We can gather running data and refer to it at any point during our training cycle. We can compare week-to-week, month-to-month or year-to-year. We can compare our mile interval times to the intervals we did last week. Hard to remember all this data unless it is logged.

 

  1. Some people may train with heart rate monitors and this can also be included as well. You can record your resting heart rate in the morning as a way to judge the level of your fatigue. A higher resting heart rate than your baseline usually means your body is fatigued or did not recover fully from the previous day. So pay attention to this when planning for that day’s workout.

 

  1. You can also record subjective feelings about how you felt during the workout. These notes all can add up and help you adjust your training plan to track what is and isn’t working.

 

  1. Noting which shoes were worn during training runs can help you know when you should change shoes.

 

  1. Sleep can be monitored in the log as well as it certainly affects training performance.

 

  1. Use a log during any injury and as an injury prevention tool. Look at the log and the events preceding your injury to see if there is anything you could have done to prevent the injury.

 

  1. Check your log in times of doubt to look at all the work you have put in and realize you are on the way to achieving your goals. Use it to boost your confidence.

 

Keeping a diary is simple. It can be kept on anything from a calendar to a computer. There are many computer programs that log training data. A spiral notebook serves well as a training diary. In the simplest form, the training log should record time and distance of run. If you did intervals, make sure to record how many, what distance and your time.

 

Once you have your log set up, enjoy it. Have fun with it. Realize that you are mapping out your future. Most runners keep a log and I believe you should as well to take your running to the next level.

 

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Dr. Michael Hartmann

Race Medical Director, Healthy Driven Naperville Marathon & Half Marathon

Emergency Room physician, Edward Hospital

 

5 Steps to Injury-Free Training

5 Steps to Injury-Free Training

If you are training for a fall marathon or half marathon, you may be concerned about injury. This is a valid concern, as injuries are common when runners train for a longer race, especially for the first time.

Fortunately, there are things you can do to minimize your chances of getting hurt.

1. Build a solid foundation. Follow a professional program that ramps your mileage slowly and methodically to a marathon training workload. Find a running program online that you can tailor to your needs or work with a certified running coach to have a customized program created just for you. Follow a program that:

  • Starts from your current fitness level
  • Ramps your workload gradually – no more than 10% mileage increase per week or per session
  • Includes slow, methodical increase of your long runs to a longer run of approximately 20 miles (possibly 21 or 22 if you have previously run the marathon race distance)
  • Includes runs of different length, speed and terrain – variety is important to prevent injury

Also, be realistic.  If you are a new runner, build your running and run regularly for at least a year before attempting your first marathon.

2. Be consistent. Now that you have your training plan, follow it closely. Consistency is one of the keys to preventing injury. This doesn’t mean you can’t miss a workout occasionally, but if you find yourself missing a week of runs, this can be a recipe for injury. Try to stay consistent with your training plan, keeping the number of runs and miles per week close to your plan. If you miss a week, ease back into the plan or work with your running coach to get back on track safely.

3. Develop good running form. It is difficult to “force” yourself into perfect running form and it can be dangerous, especially if your muscles aren’t prepared for that method of running. However, in order to prevent undue force on the body, landing with each foot underneath your body – instead of in front of your body on your heel – is usually associated with lower ground forces on the body resulting in lower injury rate. The easiest way to achieve this is to shorten and quicken your stride. If you find you are an overstrider, practice the shorter strides with feet landing underneath you on a regular basis.

4. Strength train. Running is a very repetitive sport. As a result, it creates a high probability of overuse injuries. In order to prevent these injuries, strengthening and mobilizing key areas of the body are important preventive measures. Focus on these areas:

  • Core: Strengthen the lateral and anterior core with exercises such as plank and side plank variations.
  • Hips/Glutes: Strengthen the legs, glutes and stabilizers with exercises such as lunge variations, deadlift and glute bridge variations and hip abduction work (such as clams). Also, keep the hips and hamstrings mobile with key stretches for those areas.
  • Ankles and calves: Strengthen the ankles and calves with exercises such as calf raises, jumping/plyometrics and banded ankle work. Also, keep the calves mobile with calf stretching. Try doing some of this foot and ankle work barefoot for added benefit.

A strength training program for runners, such as RunSMART, can help you work on all of these areas.

5. Pace.While training, most of your running should be at a slow, conversational pace. Many people overtrain on their easy days and carry fatigue into their hard runs. Make sure you keep your easy days easy, even if you are a veteran runner. Following the pacing of your running program, as well as the distances, helps keep injury at bay.

These suggestions will help you avoid injury this summer and have a great fall marathon or half marathon.

Good luck!

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Laurie Lasseter
Marathoner
ACE Certified Personal Trainer
RRCA Certified Running Coach
Edward-Elmhurst Health & Fitness Centers
www.EEHealth.org/fitness

Improve Your Time in 2016

Improve Your Time in 2016

So, you’ve run a marathon or half marathon (or maybe two or three) with the goal of “just finishing”. Congratulations! Finishing one of these runs is a tremendous accomplishment! But you may now be at the point in your running and racing career when you want to run faster, set a new personal record (PR) or meet a specific time goal. If that’s the case, you’ll need to modify your training program.

Your previous training has probably been completed at conversational pace, which is an easy pace in the lower part of your aerobic range. You may have incorporated some hill training and a bit of tempo running, but for the most part, your running has been at your steady conversational pace. In order to achieve a time goal, incorporate more running at a faster pace. Here’s how:

 *   Interval Training: This type of training improves your aerobic capacity and running efficiency and teaches your body to run faster while in an aerobic mode. For the marathon, intervals will be somewhere between ½-mile and 1½-miles. These intervals will be run at, or slightly faster than, your 5K race pace and each interval will be followed by a one- to two-minute slow recovery jog. (Run as slow as needed to allow full recovery between each interval.) Start incorporating this workout about three months before your marathon. Do this one to two times per week, replacing existing runs on your training plan that occur during the week. Start with just one or two intervals per session. Add one additional interval each week or two, until you are at six to 12 intervals (six for the 1½-mile intervals, 12 for the ½-mile intervals) per session. Taper these runs down during the final three weeks, as you will do with the rest of your running. For the half marathon, build up to four to 10 intervals (four for 1½-mile intervals, 10 for ½-mile intervals) rather than six to 12.

 *   Tempo work: During long runs, incorporate some tempo running. These workouts increase your aerobic capacity and improve your aerobic/anaerobic threshold. In addition, this type of workout teaches your body and mind to push its limits when you are tired. Here again, start incorporating this about three months before your race by including about 30 minutes at tempo pace in the second half of your long run. (Tempo pace is somewhere between your 10K and 10 mile race pace.) As your long runs increase in time and distance over the next weeks, build the tempo portion to 45 minutes for your final long run of 20-22 miles. Once again, you will not do this work in the last two to three weeks before the race, since you won’t be doing long runs during the taper period. For the half marathon, start with 20 minutes at tempo pace and build up to 30-35 minutes during your final long run of 12 miles.

Be sure to pay attention to your body and how it reacts to these workouts, as everyone is different in their response. A bit of soreness is normal, but if you find you’re having persistent soreness, unusual aches and pains or extreme fatigue, back off on the progressions described above. If you want a more personalized program, consider working with a running coach on a specific workout for you.

These two additions to your workouts will really improve your aerobic capacity and your mental and physical toughness. They also allow you to really push your limits and accomplish a new personal record or time goal. Best of luck!

Img_Fitness_7B_LaurieLasseter
Laurie Lasseter
Marathoner
ACE Certified Personal Trainer
RRCA Certified Running Coach
Edward-Elmhurst Health & Fitness Centers

10 Last-Minute Marathon and Half Marathon Tips

10 Last-Minute Marathon and Half Marathon Tips

By Dr. Michael Hartmann and Laurie Lasseter

This is it, the final stretch. Months of your life, more effort than you imagined and quite possibly, millions of steps have led you to these last days of training. With not much more than the big day ahead, here are our last-minute tips for marathon/half marathon day survival.

  1. Plan everything. Plan transportation to the race and from the finish area. Let friends and family know where you’ll meet them after the race. Do everything you can in advance, right down to trimming your toenails and pinning on your bib the night before the race.

  1. Not too much race expo. The expo is fun and a great way to get excited for the race, but don’t spend too much time or energy walking there. Don’t try any samples of new foods or drinks either. Save them for after the race.

  1. Weather rules. The most important thing is to wear layers on race day. Layering is crucial, as you’ll be shedding clothing as your body heats up. Don’t forget gloves and a hat if it’s chilly. And be sure to wear items you’re okay with tossing in the garbage throughout the race, if necessary.

  1. The perfect gear bag. The following items are must-haves for a well-stocked race bag: throwaway clothing (sweatshirt, sweatpants, early race shirt, gloves, headband or hat), plastic garbage bags, throwaway blanket, almost-empty Body Glide or Vaseline, sunscreen, toilet paper, pre-race hydration, pre-race food, early race hydration (including a fuel belt, if needed for especially congested races.)

  1. Lubricate!Make sure to lubricate all potential chafing spots before the race with Body Glide or Vaseline. Anywhere there is friction, like armpits and nipples, is a potential trouble spot for chafing.

  1. Practice gratitude. Remember, the volunteers and spectators are the ones who make the race possible. Take time before, during and after the race to thank them. Not only does it make them feel great, it boosts your race satisfaction, too.

  1. Do what works. Do not try anything new on race day. Shoes should be broken in and apparel pre-worn (preferably during your long training runs). Eat food you know digests easily. The same old choices leave less room for surprises.

  1. Be mindful of mechanics. During the race, focus on good form to get you through rough patches. Focus on staying relaxed, especially in the upper body. If your legs need a break, focus more on your arm swing and vice versa.

  1. Remember your mantra. Choose a saying that you’ll repeat during the race, especially when fatigue and discomfort visit. Whatever you choose, find one that motivates you. If you aren’t a “mantra person,” just try to stay focused and positive during rough patches and remember that your training has properly prepared you for success.

  1. Roll with the punches. Weather or unanticipated terrain difficulty can thwart your plans. Visualize yourself overcoming challenges and be ready to adjust expectations if needed. You’ve come this far and you will succeed! Good luck!

DrMichaelHartmann3

Dr. Michael Hartmann

Race Medical Director, Healthy Driven Naperville Marathon & Half Marathon

Emergency Room physician, Edward Hospital

Img_Fitness_7B_LaurieLasseter

Laurie Lasseter

Marathoner

ACE Certified Personal Trainer

RRCA Certified Running Coach

Edward-Elmhurst Health & Fitness Centers

Planning and Practicing for Race Day

Planning and practicing for race day

By Linnea Omholt, Edward Rehabilitation Services and Sports Medicine

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As the race draws near, anticipation builds. With the training days dwindling, keep your eye on the prize. Sticking to your plan now is critical as you make your way toward the starting line. Here are my final-month plan and practice tips to ensure you’re prepared when it’s time to RUN!

No double sessions required. This isn’t school and you don’t need to cram in missed workouts to make up training. Take things one day at a time and if you miss a run or cross-training session, pick right back up the next day. This is not the time to overdo your workouts and wear yourself out.

Your body knows. You’ve been preparing for months and you’re ready. But as the day draws near, be sure to listen to your body, looking for signs that you need more nutrition or rest. If you wake up feeling you haven’t recovered from the prior day’s workout, up your food intake and get more sleep the next night.

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Longest run alert. If you plan to taper, and you should, your longest run should be 3-4 weeks before the race to allow your body enough recovery time. Plan to mimic as many aspects of the race as you can during that long run, such as your pre-run nutrition, the race time, your during-run hydration, your wardrobe and your route.

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Time off. Plan to take a day off two days before the big day to allow your body to rest. The day before the event, go for an easy run, about 15 to 18 minutes in length, to keep your muscles loose and ready. If you’ve followed a different plan for a previous marathon, do that instead. Consistency and comfort–from both a physical and mental standpoint—is key.

Get mental. In the last few weeks before the marathon, do what you can to reduce stress. Stay in and off your feet, letting your body rest and conserve the energy it will need. Spend time visualizing yourself throughout the race running past course landmarks, feel the excitement of the crowd and imagine crossing the finish line. It’s almost here—enjoy your amazing accomplishment!

For more of my favorite last minute marathon tips, visit Runner’s World’s 26 Tips for Running Your Best 26.2.

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Linnea Omholt, PT, DPT

Edward Rehabilitation Services and Sports Medicine

www.EEHealth.org/services/rehabilitation

Got pain? Get it checked out.

Got pain? Get it checked out.

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By Linnea Omholt and Luke Smith, Edward Rehabilitation Services and Sports Medicine

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Let’s face it, the rigors of marathon training aren’t for the faint of heart. The daily runs, growing in length, take commitment and will, and for most, require the ability to handle a few aches and pains. But how do you know when to seek medical attention for pain related to running? The incidence of injury for those training for a marathon has been reported as high as 90 percent, so don’t ignore those persistent pains – seek help sooner rather than later.

Sudden pain while running. If you feel a jolt of pain that disappears, it probably isn’t something to be concerned with. But if a sudden pain persists or worsens, it’s time to visit the doctor. Sudden pain could be the sign of a tear or sprain.

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Increasing pain while running. Runners are experts at pushing through pain, but pain that increases in intensity during a run could be an indicator of injury. Conditions like shin splints, runner’s knee or stress fractures can present with pain that worsens during a run and improves with rest. Seek attention if pain does not improve or continues to persist even with rest. Injuries such as plantar fasciitis (pain in bottom of the foot) may hurt at the beginning of the run, reduce during the run and then reoccur after rest.

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Pain after running. Post-run pain is common and not necessarily a sign of injury, but if it’s outside your body’s normal response or persistent, it’s worth a quick assessment. Injuries with significant inflammatory processes can show up after running. Get it checked out if pain and/or inflammation does not subside.

If you are unable to bear weight or have uncontrolled bleeding, seek medical attention immediately. It is okay to take a few days to monitor your pain and rest before seeking medical attention if you are not in excruciating pain. If you feel better, great! With a few pain-free days under your belt, you can start training again at a low intensity, keeping a close eye out for reoccurrence. Add cross training to your program if you haven’t already to help keep running injuries at bay. But if pain continues even with rest, get an evaluation so you can recover and return to training, and reach your marathon goals.

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Linnea Omholt, PT, DPT
Edward Rehabilitation Services and Sports Medicine
www.edward.org/rehab

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Luke Smith PT, DPT, CSCS
Edward Rehabilitation Services and Sports Medicine
www.edward.org/rehab

Ways to Avoid Training Burnout

By Laurie Lasseter, Edward-Elmhurst Health & Fitness Centers

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Let’s face it, training for a marathon is tough. And repetitive. Rest assured, occasional burnout is normal, even for the most elite athletes. Push through with one my five top tips for keeping training boredom and burnout at bay.

  1. Ease up (or race!) Take an assessment to determine if your burnout stems from overtraining or from staleness/boredom. If you show symptoms of overtraining – higher-than-normal resting heart rate, chronic muscle and/or joint aches, persistent fatigue, difficulty in completing normal workouts – it’s time to ease up on your training volume and/or intensity. On the other hand, if you’re feeling bored with your running workouts, it might be time to schedule a shorter race. Just don’t overdo the racing before the marathon. A 5k or two, a few months before the marathon, or a half marathon approximately 4-6 weeks before your marathon, is fine. These shorter races should help you hone your performance for the marathon.

  1. Plan long run rewards.Choose a reward that you give yourself only in relation to your long runs. This might be a special pre-run meal, post-run treat or activity, or a special new audiobook or music download to listen to during your run.

  1. Mix it up.Make sure your training plan has a good mix of pacing, run lengths and terrain. And, change the type of cross training you do occasionally to ensure you don’t do the same workouts day after day, week after week.

  1. Release the pressure!It’s okay to have time goals in key races, but if you find you’re putting undue pressure on yourself to meet time goals in every workout, it’s probably time to ease up for a while and focus on just enjoying your runs.

  1. Create a support system.Make time for running group activities, which allow you to connect and commiserate with other runners and can give your training a big boost. For more information, check out my July post – Community Spirit.

Running a Marathon and Running a Business

By: Nicki Anderson
President & CEO of the Naperville Area Chamber of Commerce
I am very proud of the fact that I have completed a marathon and a number of half marathons. How I love to run. I’m also proud of the fact that I founded a business, and ran it successfully for almost 20 years.  During my years as a business owner, I became more dedicated to my running, more for sanity than vanity. And as the discipline to run a business coincided with the discipline of running, I began to realize the parallels between running a business and running a race- successfully.
4 P’s- Prior Planning Prevents Poor Performance- Whether you’re choosing to start a business, start a new job or run a race for the first time, plan well.  Whether it’s a strategic plan for your business, or research for your new position or race, do your homework and make sure you’re setting yourself up for success by planning and preparing. It will be the difference between mediocrity and excellence.
Determination reigns supreme- Up for a new position?  Making the commitment to realize your entrepreneurial dream? Finally going to train for that race?  All of these require determination. The definition for determination that resonates with me is, firmness of purpose; resolution.  It’s about focus and having the desire that so dominates your actions that there is no stopping you. Determination trumps fear which goes a long way in making great things happen.
Realistic Expectations- Regardless of your path, realistic expectations play an important role in how you deal with the outcome. Personally, I tend to be an eternal optimist, when it comes to breaking records as a runner, or becoming an international success with a business in 6 months, realistic expectations help me keep my goals in check.  It’s one thing to be optimistic; it’s another to be irresponsible.
It’s not about the win, it’s about the finish- The idea of winning anything can be an endorphin trigger, the excitement of being the first, or the best. However, when it comes to running a race or building a business being the best might be fine, but first you have you prove your worthiness which comes with a lot of foundation building.  The ability to properly plan and execute is in of itself, rewarding.  Given that I have never trained to be a world class runner, the win is likely not in the stars. But the fact that I can set a goal, do the hard work and make it happen is very exciting.  Build the foundation around a great work ethic and you can define your own win and in some instances it’s just about crossing the finish line, or opening up the doors of your business.
Celebrate the success but don’t discount the journey- There have been times that I have been more proud of the discipline that I put in to my training or business growth than anything else. Not to mention, the journey is where you learn so many of your life lessons. Although I encourage every athlete, entrepreneur or professional to celebrate milestones, there an awful lot of satisfaction when looking back at how you made it all happen.
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